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Conference Presentation Abstracts and Bios



FRIDAY EVENING WORKSHOPS

Behavior Analysis and Sustainability

Speaker:

Susan M. Schneider

Bio:

Susan Schneider corresponded with B. F. Skinner through an engineering career and a Peace Corps stint, ultimately obtaining her Ph.D. in behavior analysis (University of Kansas).  A research pioneer, she was the first to apply generalized matching to sequences and to demonstrate operant generalization in neonates.  Her publications also cover the history and philosophy of behavior analysis, and she’s championed the inclusive interdisciplinary “systems” approach to nature-nurture relations.  She’s served on the JEAB and Behavior Analyst editorial boards.  Her trade book, The Science of Consequences, covers operant behavior, its larger nature-nurture context, and its full range of applications, receiving advance praise from experts in genetics, neuroscience, and economics as well as behavior analysis.  It earned a mention in top journal Nature, was a selection of the Scientific American Book Club, and won the 2015 Media Award from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis. Schneider’s extensive book tour has crisscrossed the US and Europe. She is currently focused on applying behavior analysis to climate change mitigation.

Abstract and Objectives:

This workshop provides an introduction to behavior analysis efforts in sustainability. In this era of onrushing climate change, achieving sustainability presents a critical challenge that we are uniquely positioned to help address. The workshop includes an overview of the historical behavior-analytic role in founding environmental psychology, and current efforts within our field. Popular approaches to behavioral sustainability like McKenzie-Mohr’s will be summarized, along with other major developments in the mainstream. Strategies for professional involvement will be covered, with success stories. Strategies for volunteer involvement will also be included. Participants will have the chance to brainstorm about what behavior analysts can contribute, and work out an overall strategy for a particular sustainability project of their choosing.

  1. To summarize the early history of behavior analysis in sustainability. At the conclusion of the event, the participant will appreciate the critical role our discipline played, and the nature of our early contributions.
  2. To assess where behavior analysis methods are most likely to be useful in addressing sustainability. At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be aware of the range of typical behavioral sustainability goals and projects.
  3. To appreciate how behavior analysis complements McKenzie-Mohr’s and other popular current approaches to sustainability. At the conclusion of the event, the participant will understand the basics of these strategies.
  4. To foster the design of a behavior-analytic intervention in sustainability. At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to draw on a variety of resources to optimize planning and implementation.
  5. To learn how to get involved in sustainability at a variety of levels – both as a professional and as a volunteer. At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to employ effective strategies for getting into a position to use behavior analysis to make a difference in this critical area.

 

Ethics, Regulation, and Licensure Applied to OBM: Why OBMers Should Consider Board Certification

Speaker:

Dr. Nicholas L Weatherly, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA

Bio:

Dr. Nicholas Weatherly is a business and leadership consultant and an Associate Professor in the School of Behavior Analysis at the Florida Institute of Technology, where he also serves as chair of the Master of Arts program in Professional Behavior Analysis.  His expertise is in developing and providing efficient training and leadership solutions designed to maximize performance and create sustainable impact. He has been invited to speak on these topics locally and internationally for over 15 years, giving or contributing to nearly 100 scholarly presentations and workshops. Prior to joining Florida Tech, Dr. Weatherly was a consultant with Aubrey Daniels International where he led their instructional systems projects and consulted in a variety of areas of business and industry including manufacturing, energy, banking, health insurance, and clinical services. He has held advisory roles and served on the board of directors for a number of state, regional, and international professional associations, advocacy groups, and service facilities, most recently serving as Past-President of the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts and on various ethics committees for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Dr. Weatherly is on the editorial board for the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management and has published numerous articles on areas related to leadership, ethics, coaching, training, and safety. He is the co-author of Deliberate Coaching: A Toolbox for Accelerating Teacher Performance.

Abstract and Objectives:

Do behavior analysts working in Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) need to be certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (BACB®)? Is there value or is this simply an added hassle for OBM students and practitioners that will never pay off? Does the BACB even apply to OBM aside from a few choice areas? These and related questions have been asked since the formation of the BACB and can often lead to the dissemination of misleading information about the job market for OBM, university options, the BACB, OBM ethics, and other areas where credentialing meets OBM. Understanding these issues can help students maximize their university experience and help practitioners expand their value and protect their right to practice. The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with the information necessary to make an informed decision as to whether they, their students, their direct reports, or their colleagues should seek certification and licensure in behavior analysis.

Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to identify how credentialing and regulation applies to those practicing in areas of Organizational Behavior Management.
2. The participant will be able to identify ways the BACB task list applies to Organizational Behavior Management.
3. The participant will be able to identify key parts of the Ethics Code that apply to managers, business owners, and consultants.
4. The participant will be able to weigh the pros and cons of certification against their own career goals.

SATURDAY KEYNOTES

Deliberate Coaching: The Role of Organizational Coaching Systems in Culture Change

Speaker:

Dr. Nicholas L Weatherly, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA

Abstract:

Decades of research on applying behavior analysis to business and leadership practices has given us a number of tools proven to be effective at creating meaningful behavior change. However, OBM is not a one-stop-shop, only to be accessed when something goes wrong. Good leaders don’t just wait for an issue and then work to put out the fire; they proactively assess and coach to avoid the issue in the first place. They are deliberate with their performance-improvement efforts. Systemic culture change comes through sustainable leadership initiatives and at the core of these initiatives are leadership coaching systems. The purpose of this address is to discuss leadership and coaching in the context of organizational culture and management practices, while offering tips for sustainable performance-management systems.

Objectives:

1. The participant will be able to provide various ways coaching has been defined, demonstrated, and programmed.
2. The participant will be able to describe the difference between maintenance and institutionalization and why this distinction is important when assessing
management practices.
3. The participant will be able to list ways to help ensure coaching initiatives are deliberate, effective and produce performance improvements that last.

 

Operant Principles Everywhere: Interdisciplinary Behavior Analysis and the Future of Our Field

Speaker:

Susan M. Schneider

Abstract:

Operant principles apply everywhere from simple invertebrates to Wall Street. It’s reassuring to observe how scientists and practitioners in related fields are increasingly discovering “our” operant principles and applications–with or without discovering our field and its established terminology, methodology, and practices. Like other sciences, ours has always been part of a larger interdisciplinary effort. Interdisciplinary work is arguably more important than ever: We now know how fully operant principles interact with others in the large and complex nature-and-nurture system, for example.

This talk takes stock of our field’s current interdisciplinary extensions, with their boundless opportunities. Our biological context includes significant advances in operant-related genetics and epigenetics as well as sophisticated neuroscience. When it comes to higher-order skills, the functional linguists are among many fellow travelers. In application, ever more randomized controlled trials are expanding our reach in the mainstream, even as our small-n designs are increasingly accepted (and even adopted). I will summarize selected advances in all of these areas, and discuss what behavior analysts can learn and how we can contribute. While interdisciplinary work entails some barriers to be surmounted, the benefits can be considerable, and they flow in both directions.

Objectives:

1. To provide examples of interdisciplinary extensions of behavior analysis in its biological context, including evolution, instincts, epigenetics, and neuroscience.  At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to describe examples of interdisciplinary work relevant to behavior analysis in these areas.

2.  To provide examples of interdisciplinary extensions of behavior analysis in higher-order skills such as language, and in application.  At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to describe examples of interdisciplinary work relevant to behavior analysis in these areas.

3.  To cover the advantages to behavior analysts of following and/or participating in interdisciplinary work.  At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to state the reasons why behavior analysts and, more broadly, biobehavioral science and practice benefit when we contribute to–and learn from–related fields.

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